6 Things We Want From 'Destiny 2'

A New Approach to Loot and Player Inventory
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How Bungie's eagerly awaited sequel could fix the missteps of the original and be truly great

How Bungie's eagerly awaited sequel could fix the missteps of the original and be truly great

A New Approach to Loot and Player Inventory

While we're talking about exotic guns and other loot, we should address the matter of the vault system – which, by the way, has just been destroyed at the start of Destiny 2. Player inventory in general is a total mess in the current build of Destiny. Yes, this is a game where we collect things; we shoot, we loot, and then we do it all over again. But does every item have to feel so completely disposable? So much of players' time with the first game has been spent obsessing over "rolls," meaning the unique set of attributes and statistics imprinted on a specific item as it drops at the end of an activity.

Many have already discussed, ad nauseum, the unfairness of the game's luck-of-the-draw reward system. What I take issue with most, however, is the fact that I never feel attached to any given piece of armor or weapon, no matter the rarity. Twice, over the course of the game's life cycle, I've deleted three max-level characters, along with everything in my vault, and started playing the game from scratch. The reason I did this is because Destiny had ceased to present me with any modicum of genuine excitement; I'd seen the sights, I'd "caught 'em all" (I'm talking about exotic guns, of course), and – for some reason – I still loved the game enough to do it all over again, and again.

I'd love it even more, though, if dismantling a weapon didn't mean it shattered to pieces, suddenly becoming raw material, but instead stripped it down to a set of modular, reusable parts: different sights, frames, barrels, triggers, grips, magical space-wizard gems, et cetera, that I could then use to assemble something slightly different, more individualized.

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